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Get Real

Lawrence Kasdan, director of the upcoming movie adaptation of Stephen King’s SF novel Dreamcatcher, told SCI FI Wire that he wanted to ground the film’s outlandish visual effects in reality. “I said to [cinematographer John Seale], when we first started talking, ‘You know, there’s going to be a bunch of effects,'” he said in an interview. “‘There’s going to be physical effects. There’s going to be digital effects. But I want us to treat them like it’s all happening in the room.’ And we’re shooting it that way.”

Kasdan added that he gave Seale the freedom to move the camera liberally. “We’re never going to set it up, you know, in a special way, just because some digital effect is coming in here,” he said. “I want to move the camera like crazy. We actually used two or three cameras for every single setup. And a lot of cameramen can’t do that when there’s no effects. But John loves the challenge of that. And so we shot it as you would as though the creatures were characters who we’d hired and were coming on stage. It gives you enormous freedom.”

Dreamcatcher, about four friends whose backwoods hunting trip turns into a horrific encounter with aliens, has more than 400 visual-effects shots, something new to Kasdan. “I had done a lot of action on the westerns [Silverado and Wyatt Earp] that I’d directed,” he said. “But what I’d never done was the effects. And there’s a good bit of dealing with them while you’re shooting the movie. But what really surprised me was, when the movie’s done shooting, it’s like you have the second movie to make. … Right this week, we’re still working out effects. And I started shooting a year ago. Where you’d normally be editing what you’d done in post, here, you’re still creating the movie in post-production.” Industrial Light & Magic is handling many of the visual effects.

Perhaps the most elaborate sequence comes at the end of the movie, Kasdan said. “Maybe the most complicated effects-wise is … the military goes out to try to destroy this alien ship,” he said. “And they use four Apache attack helicopters on this huge alien ship. That’s a lot of effects.” Dreamcatcher opens April 4.

Dreamcatcher F/X Get Real

Lawrence Kasdan, director of the upcoming movie adaptation of Stephen King’s SF novel Dreamcatcher, told SCI FI Wire that he wanted to ground the film’s outlandish visual effects in reality. “I said to [cinematographer John Seale], when we first started talking, ‘You know, there’s going to be a bunch of effects,'” he said in an interview. “‘There’s going to be physical effects. There’s going to be digital effects. But I want us to treat them like it’s all happening in the room.’ And we’re shooting it that way.”

Kasdan added that he gave Seale the freedom to move the camera liberally. “We’re never going to set it up, you know, in a special way, just because some digital effect is coming in here,” he said. “I want to move the camera like crazy. We actually used two or three cameras for every single setup. And a lot of cameramen can’t do that when there’s no effects. But John loves the challenge of that. And so we shot it as you would as though the creatures were characters who we’d hired and were coming on stage. It gives you enormous freedom.”

Dreamcatcher, about four friends whose backwoods hunting trip turns into a horrific encounter with aliens, has more than 400 visual-effects shots, something new to Kasdan. “I had done a lot of action on the westerns [Silverado and Wyatt Earp] that I’d directed,” he said. “But what I’d never done was the effects. And there’s a good bit of dealing with them while you’re shooting the movie. But what really surprised me was, when the movie’s done shooting, it’s like you have the second movie to make. … Right this week, we’re still working out effects. And I started shooting a year ago. Where you’d normally be editing what you’d done in post, here, you’re still creating the movie in post-production.” Industrial Light & Magic is handling many of the visual effects.

Perhaps the most elaborate sequence comes at the end of the movie, Kasdan said. “Maybe the most complicated effects-wise is … the military goes out to try to destroy this alien ship,” he said. “And they use four Apache attack helicopters on this huge alien ship. That’s a lot of effects.” Dreamcatcher opens April 4.

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